EMOJI RATINGS vs NUMBERED SCALES

In case you are interested what works better for the users (in short).

EMOJI RATINGS

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or NUMBERED SCALES

Jim Lewis and Jeff Sauro are exploring how to use emoji instead of standard answers in polls. In August 2020, they collected 240 participants from a U.S. panel agency and asked them to rate different streaming and entertainment services (article and report).

Participants were randomly assigned to different types of surveys, variables and research started.

Results:

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Emojis offer an alternative to labels that may be easier for people to respond to, and they don’t need to be translated.

In this experiment, however, researchers found no significant differences or interactions between mean UMUX-Lite ratings collected with standard linear numeric scales and face emoji scales.

So, UX researchers can use standard formats without worrying that they’re somehow missing something important by not using the more exotic format. If someone in authority insists on an equivalent nonstandard format, UX researchers can use the equivalent format with confidence, saving their energy for the discussions that matter.

The same for SLIDERS vs NUMBERED SCALES

335 participants from a US panel agency rated the streaming entertainment services from May through June 2020, and out of this larger sample, 180 participants provided ratings with numeric and slider scales.

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Results:

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So, it can be tempting to use sliders in place of more standard linear numeric scales. It just feels like they should provide a better indication of the feelings and attitudes of the people providing the ratings (there is a cool factor to them!).

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